Tag Archives: 2015

Shaw TV Story

i Jun 1st No Comments by

Shaw TV’s “Go Fraser Valley” did a story on the Miami Streamkeepers Society on May 25, 2015. Thanks Jonathan!

PSF Grant 2014

i Mar 14th No Comments by

PACIFIC SALMON FOUNDATION – COMMUNITY SALMON PROGRAM

planting Nov.3'14 003

   Recipient:

Miami River Streamkeepers Society

           Grant Value:  $6532.00
        Project Value:  $29,857.00
               Start Date:  July 2014
                 End Date:  Spring 2015

Objectives Achieved:

  • Riparian Planting And Invasive Plant Removal: 1200 m2 of streamside native shrub planting
  • Install 3-Interpretive Signs: Aquatic Wildlife, Trail Map, Miami River Greenway Project Supporters
  • Promote Community Awareness Of Living Responsibly Near Riparian Areas: Storm drain marking / Door hangers with Harrison Hot Springs Preschool & Childcare
  • Salmonids in the Classroom: Harrison Elementary School to raise 50 Coho fry and release in Spring 2015
  • Monitoring: Survival of new native plantings / Quarterly Water Quality Survey
  • Public Participation:  Health & Wellness Fair / Earth  Day/ Know Your Garden / Canada Day Parade / Harrison Lagoon & Foreshore Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup / Public Planting

Salmonids in the classroom

i Mar 9th 1 Comment by

PSF 8c Salmonid Tank

The project was undertaken by the Grade 2 and 3 students at the end of January 2015. Miami River Streamkeepers received grant money from the Pacific Salmon Foundation to help finance the project. Raising salmon in the classroom is an opportunity to teach students to understand, respect and protect freshwater, estuarine and marine ecosystems, and to recognize how all humans are lined to these complex environments.

Salmon fry released into Miami River May 19th 2015. Read all about it:

Northwestern Salamander

i Jan 13th No Comments by
Northwestern Salamander

Northwestern Salamander

The Northwestern Salamander is a stout, 5 1/2 to 8-inch long uniform dark brown to black, amphibian (cold-blooded animal that start life in water & later transform to a terrestrial form) with a oval tail flattened towards the end. It has strong , well-developed legs and prominent parotoid (swollen area behind eye). Salamanders are voiceless.

It is found mainly in south-western BC. Eggs are laid in February to May in jelly-like masses about the size of a elongated grapefruit. The larvae hatch in about a month and stay in the water about a year. Some metamorphose (change into adult form) in the second summer but others remain in the larval stage indefinitely (neoteny) and breed without gaining adult form.

In the aquatic form they eat voraciously preying on all other living things small enough to swallow. On land look for them under leave litter.

Western Toad

i Jan 11th No Comments by
Western Toad

Western Toad

The Western Toad (Anaxyrus boreas) (formerly Northwestern toad – Bufo boreas) is a stout, squat 2-5 inch amphibian of the west found from Alaska to northern California. It has shorter front than hind leg. The skin is rough with large warts. Colour is variable from dark brown to reddish brown background with lighter warts.

Adults congegrate in early Spring along margins of wetlands and lakes to spawn. The male calls with a high pitched note. The eggs are laid in long strings in shallow water. Jet-black tadpoles hatch in a few days and gather in large swarms. Growth is rapid and they exit water at 1/2 inch long to migrate to near by woods. Highway crossing prove dangerous and many toadlets are squashed.  Ryder Lake road is a well known hazard.

Adult toads wander considerable distance form water and can be found foraging at dusk for insects and other small creeping organisms.  At dawn they retire to damp holes and shaded spots.  Look for them along the Miami greenway riparian area.  Western Toads are a species of conservation concern.